Constitutions, rights and law

The unedifying Brexit debate: learning lessons from across the pond

  Whether you were for or against Brexit, most would agree that the referendum campaign was far from instructive. It brought out the worst in British politics: primarily two sets of over-privileged, middle-aged white males throwing opinions, thinly disguised as ‘facts’, and insults at each other. It was hard to hear any of the diverse...

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What Future Do We Want?

  As everyone woke up to Brexit on 24 June, there was a dawning realization that we were in uncharted territory. The campaign was focused on what we were trying to avoid, not where we wanted to head. That was true of the Remainers, with their increasingly apocalyptic warnings of what would happen if we...

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The EU Referendum and the UK’s Environment: What are the implications for democracy?

Charlotte Burns and Viviane Gravey argue that the EU Referendum debate in the UK has been "surprisingly quiet on the issue of the environment". They look at three options for the UK from the point of view of their impacts on participatory democracy, as well as point to the tension between participation and stable long term rules for environmental protection. They believe that the terms of the current debate are far too narrow. "National sovereignty is essentially a red herring that offers little in the way of genuine democratisation of environmental (or any other) policy area."

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The EU Referendum, Democracy and Sustainable Development

Graham Smith is Professor of Politics at the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster and a specialist in democratic innovation and citizen engagement, with a particular interest in climate politics and the representation of future generations. He is the Chair of FDSD’s Board of Trustees. Britain is about to make a fundamental...

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Citizens sue their governments for action on climate change

“Global warming is already disrupting the planet’s weather”, a recent New York Times article reads, “now it is having an impact on the courts as well, as adults and children around the world try to enlist the judiciary in their efforts to blunt climate change.” After a landmark ruling in Holland in 2015, in which...

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A bold move toward public problem solving on a global scale? | Anne-Marie Slaughter on the Paris Agreement

In her recent blog for the Project Syndicate, Anne-Marie Slaughter, former president of the American Society of International Law, offers an optimistic take on the non-binding nature of the Paris Agreement. As she argues: “its deficits in this regard are its greatest strengths as a model for effective global governance in the twenty-first century.” She...

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Sophie Howe appointed first Future Generations Commissioner for Wales

Following the adoption of the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act in April 2015, the Welsh Government has appointed its first Future Generations Commissioner, Sophie Howe, currently Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner for South Wales. “Public bodies in Wales have been put on warning”, WalesOnline reports, “…if they think their duties under the Well-being of...

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Sustainable Development Goal 16: Governance

You’re probably familiar with the United Nation’s (UN)Millenium Development Goals (MDG), adopted in 2000, for improving well being for the world’s poorest. They carried the tagline, “we can end poverty.” It’s estimated that roughly 40% of the eight goals, listed at the bottom, will be met by the deadline of 2015. A new set of...

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Peter Davies spoke at the re-launch of FDSD in London, June 29th 2015

Peter Davies, Welsh Commissioner for Sustainable Futures, spoke at the re-launch of FDSD about the innovative 2015 Wellbeing of Future Generations (Wales) Act and how it can inspire action and change not only in Wales but across the rest of the UK and beyond. The event, hosted by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, was held...

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